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Why Me?

It's a question that has long puzzled medical researchers.

Why do African-American men have the highest rates of prostate cancer in the world?

This disease is the leading type of cancer diagnosed among all men in the United States, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Yet black men are 35% more likely than white men to develop prostate cancer, and they are two to three times more likely to die of it.

                                         - Timothy Gower

Don't Go It ALONE

We men often isolate ourselves when facing the possibility or discovery of having prostate cancer.

We sometimes plant our head as far up our derriere as possible, avoiding reality. This does not help our situation. In the meantime, doctors continue to urge men, especially African-American men, to take control and grasp the power that comes with knowledge about a disease that can be much less disastrous and, in some cases, "cured" if it's detected in its early stages.

Confidentiality Is Basic

Your specific situation or concerns are never passed on.

You're in control, so be honest with yourself. It's easy to forget that your health affects your peers, loved ones, family members (Wives, children, significant other,and close friends ).

Life Seems Unfair

Let's get that out up front to begin with.

Prostate Cancer is the leading cause of cancer among all men; however, African-American men die at a rate 2.4 times (140%) higher than Hispanic, Native American, Koreans and Japanese.This is one area we do not want to lead the field in.

 

According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 186,320 new cases, and 28,660 death will occur in the U.S.this year.

When Prostate Cancer develops, the PSA level usually goes above 4. Rates peaked in white men in 1992 ( 237.8 per 100,000 men) and in African American men in 1993 (343.1 per 100,000 men).

 

Although death rates have decreased more rapidly among African-American men than among white men since the early 1990s, rates among African-American men remain more than twice as high as those of their white male counterparts.

The Physical Exam

Getting screened will not change your sexual orientation. Prostate screening is part of your overall health maintenance plan. Just as you take care of that car you have parked outside, you do a lot more to maintain your health, right?

The physical exam you have once a year?

The eyes getting checked, heart and lungs and that visit to the laboratory. Give a little urine, let them take some blood to check all sort of things.

The PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) should be a part of the blood testing process as is the DRE (Digital Rectal Exam) finger wave.

Let's Talk About Sex

Our masculine identity is in one way or another tied into our sexuality.

What are we if not what we imagine

ourselves to be?

 

Sexuality is an important part of everyday life. Feelings about sexuality affect our zest for living, our self-image, and our relationships.

How is this Prostate thing going to effect my sex life?

 

Impotence is a huge fear among most young and married/single guys.

Will I have trouble having or maintaining an erection?

 

You need to know how particular treatments can affect you. So that you can decide which treatment is best for you. And that you are prepared to handle any sexual side effects that may develop after therapy.

Our commitment is to help you and your loved ones get through a difficult time in your life. 
 
We are not DOCTORS, and we will NOT RECOMMEND any type of TREATMENT or DOCTOR'S REFERRAL to assist in your care.
 
What we will do is provide Information, Leadership, and Moral Support.
Why Me?

It's a question that has long puzzled medical researchers.

Why do African-American men have the highest rates of prostate cancer in the world?

This disease is the leading type of cancer diagnosed among all men in the United States, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Yet black men are 35% more likely than white men to develop prostate cancer, and they are two to three times more likely to die of it.

                                         - Timothy Gower

Don't Go It ALONE

We men often isolate ourselves when facing the possibility or discovery of having prostate cancer.

We sometimes plant our head as far up our derriere as possible, avoiding reality. This does not help our situation. In the meantime, doctors continue to urge men, especially African-American men, to take control and grasp the power that comes with knowledge about a disease that can be much less disastrous and, in some cases, "cured" if it's detected in its early stages.

Confidentiality Is Basic

Your specific situation or concerns are never passed on.

You're in control, so be honest with yourself. It's easy to forget that your health affects your peers, loved ones, family members (Wives, children, significant other,and close friends ).

Life Seems Unfair

Let's get that out up front to begin with.

Prostate Cancer is the leading cause of cancer among all men; however, African-American men die at a rate 2.4 times (140%) higher than Hispanic, Native American, Koreans and Japanese.This is one area we do not want to lead the field in.

 

According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 186,320 new cases, and 28,660 death will occur in the U.S.this year.

When Prostate Cancer develops, the PSA level usually goes above 4. Rates peaked in white men in 1992 ( 237.8 per 100,000 men) and in African American men in 1993 (343.1 per 100,000 men).

 

Although death rates have decreased more rapidly among African-American men than among white men since the early 1990s, rates among African-American men remain more than twice as high as those of their white male counterparts.

The Physical Exam

Getting screened will not change your sexual orientation. Prostate screening is part of your overall health maintenance plan. Just as you take care of that car you have parked outside, you do a lot more to maintain your health, right?

The physical exam you have once a year?

The eyes getting checked, heart and lungs and that visit to the laboratory. Give a little urine, let them take some blood to check all sort of things.

The PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) should be a part of the blood testing process as is the DRE (Digital Rectal Exam) finger wave.

Let's Talk About Sex

Our masculine identity is in one way or another tied into our sexuality.

What are we if not what we imagine

ourselves to be?

 

Sexuality is an important part of everyday life. Feelings about sexuality affect our zest for living, our self-image, and our relationships.

How is this Prostate thing going to effect my sex life?

 

Impotence is a huge fear among most young and married/single guys.

Will I have trouble having or maintaining an erection?

 

You need to know how particular treatments can affect you. So that you can decide which treatment is best for you. And that you are prepared to handle any sexual side effects that may develop after therapy.

Get the Facts and Don't Go It Alone

Our commitment is to help you and your loved ones get through a difficult time in your life. 
 
We are not DOCTORS, and we do NOT RECOMMEND any type of TREATMENT
or DOCTOR'S REFERRAL to assist in your care.
 
What we will do is provide INFORMATION, LEADERSHIP, and MORAL SUPPORT.

What you should know about Prostate Cancer

Additional facts about Prostate Cancer?

Prostate Cancer is cancer that occurs in a man's prostate — the walnut-size gland in the male reproductive system. It is located below the bladder in front of the rectum and surrounds the upper part of the urethra, the tube that empties urine from the bladder.

 

The prostate helps regulate bladder control and produces the seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men. Read more about how prostate cancer incidence and treatment options.

What causes Prostate Cancer?

Prostate cancer screenings make it possible to detect prostate cancer in its early stages before any symptoms are present. Being aware of the risk factors can help you determine an appropriate prostate cancer screening schedule with your physician.

What are symptoms or signs of Prostate Cancer?

In most cases, prostate cancer symptoms are not apparent in the early stages of the disease. The symptoms of prostate cancer may be different for each man and any one of these symptoms may be caused by other conditions. As a result, routine screenings in the form of digital rectal exams (DRE) and prostate-specific androgen (PSA) tests are important. The American Cancer Society recommends that men make an informed decision with their doctor about whether to be tested for prostate cancer, beginning at age 50.

 

It is recommended that African-American males start their screenings at an even earlier age. Depending on your (family history) we recommend that black males and other men of color begin prostate screenings starting at the age of 40. Men with one or more risk factors for prostate cancer should consult with their physician about whether to start routine screening earlier.

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Prostate Cancer Symptoms

Urinary symptoms of Prostate Cancer

Because of the proximity of the prostate gland in relation to the bladder and urethra, prostate cancer may be accompanied by a variety of urinary symptoms. Depending on the size and location, a tumor may press on and constrict the urethra, inhibiting the flow of urine. Some prostate cancer signs related to urination include:​

  1. Burning or pain during urination

  2. Difficulty urinating, or trouble starting and stopping while urinating

  3. More frequent urges to urinate at night

  4. Loss of bladder control

  5. Decreased flow or velocity of urine stream

  6. Blood in urine (hematuria)

Other prostate cancer signs & symptoms

Prostate cancer may spread (metastasize) to nearby tissues or bones. If cancer spreads to the spine, it may press on the spinal nerves. Other prostate cancer symptoms include:

  1. Blood in semen

  2. Difficulty getting an erection (erectile dysfunction)

  3. Painful ejaculation

  4. Swelling in legs or pelvic area

  5. Numbness or pain in the hips, legs or feet

  6. Bone pain that doesn't go away or leads to fractures

Understanding cancer symptoms

These symptoms may be attributed to a number of conditions other than cancer. If you notice any cancer signs or symptoms, it's important to visit your doctor for an accurate diagnosis.

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